/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory. File Exists but...

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory Rating: 6,5/10 291 reviews

shell

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

Suppose you want to use the excellent random number generating facilities of the Boost library. It looks as though those responses are the result of some command that you did not have in your post. I have seen this issue when creating scripts in Windows env and then porting over to run on a Unix environment. Unless you tell us what you have done, what files, which directories and reported error. Problems with libraries Somewhat similar issues to those described above can occur when you want to use a third-party library.


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64 bit

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

Another situation where you may get this error message is if you have split your header files up from your C++ source files into separate directories. In fact, the point of the script is to ensure that it is actually built according to our policies. For example, suppose you have the following code in a file called myfile. The only exception is when dir is already searched by default. How to tell the compiler where to find it g++ has an option -I.

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c++

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

One particular favourite is this one: include where you are learning C++ from a very, very old book. I've been troubleshooting a PubkeyAuthentication-only issue. Make sure that you are logged in as the user that you want to create the ssh key for first or be prepared to modify the paths in the command to the correct home directory. In notepad++ in the bottom right of the screen, it tells you the document format. Perhaps maybe it isn't and sudo is actually being broken during the build? Unix uses different line endings so can't read the file you created on Windows.

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bash

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

The better way to deal with this problem is to tell the compiler directly where to look for header files. You're following some instructions having possibly skipped some bits. This has occured on a Ubuntu Server Installation and it has also been attempted with ' Sudo '. This will result in pkeys and skeys being created as lists with each entry containing a dict for each key in the keyring. The file does not exist on the remote server.

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linux

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

I am assuming that you have enough permissions to create this directory. All the directories named by -I are searched, in left-to-right order, before the default directories. I presume you've checked that the file does exist perhaps because the shell completes it. I got around this by making a config. When I run the following code from a script it can't find the paths to the directory or files.

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No such file or directory error

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

For this, it uses a set of directories to look into, but within this set, there is no file bar. After that, ssh-keygen should work without complaints. I am aware the path to the file is correct, full path and direct current directory has been specified with same results. If you want to configure it differently, that can work too, but only if you actually understand what you are doing, what has to go where, why you put things in various locations, and how to construct the appropriate commands in the shell. I should also note that I can run sudo with other commands in other directories.


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PuTTY No such file or directory

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

Your compiler just tried to compile the file named foo. Check the server log for more information. The documentation also states: You can add to this list with the -Idir command line option. Why can't these paths be found when run from a script? If you need to reset your password,. Try running dos2unix on the script: Or just rewrite the script in your Unix env using vi and test. They hope these examples will help you to get a better understanding of the Linux system and that you feel encouraged to try out things on your own.

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Linux SCP Command Error 'Test.txt No Such File or Directory'

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

Of course, writing such command lines is error prone, and you should put such stuff in a makefile, the use of which is unfortunately outside the scope of this article. With g++, you should use at least the -Wall and -Wextra compiler options to do this: g++ -Wall -Wextra myfile. This could be so for a number of reasons. If you start over from the very beginning and post back with the exact circumstance details of what files are where, what you type at the command line, what directory you are in when you typed it, etc. If this was not so I believe this would also specify a permission denied error as I did a quick test.

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bash

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

In every case, the end result has been the same : follow the instructions precisely and it will work. Yes, proper permissions do exist, with full executable bits. Look very closely at the names in both the C++ source and in your source code directory listing. I created a passwordless ssh connection to my remote server from my mac. Could this have anything to do between Arch, such as running a 64-bit execute without 64-bit libraries? No changes have been made which would cause problems. You may need to install additional libraries you'll get an explicit error message if you do.

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Trying to SSH into server and getting key_load_public: No such file or directory error

/home/hadoop/.ssh/authorized_keys no such file or directory

You're probably trying to run a 32-bit binary on a 64-bit system that doesn't have 32-bit support installed. You need to use the correct, standard names for such headers and to get a better book! Again: Your best chance of getting this to work is to just return your directories back to the way they were before you started, read and re-read the instructions until you understand exactly what to do in each step, and then follow the instructions one step at a time. Due to these circumstances is why I more or less requested general possibilities. And you can go ahead and clone your repository with: git clone git github. Just a couple of quick thoughts.

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